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Archive for July 1st, 2009

Historical chess perspective

Posted By Josh Dillon
07.01.2009

The above video, produced by Boym Partners, shows a carefully choreographed interpretation of world events in the century’s past. Major disasters; great achievements all executed on a masterfully played chess board. Each piece represents a certain moment in history, for better or worse.

Not sure how I feel about the outcome, or the presentation for that matter, but I thought it was worth a look.

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Posted by Josh Dillon in Video | No Comments »

Marrs Woodworking

Posted By Josh Dillon
07.01.2009

Shelving-1

Shelving-2

Shelving-3

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Posted by Josh Dillon in Environmental Design | No Comments »

at the Pizza Hut and Taco Bell

Posted By Jaime Gassmann
07.01.2009

ac_dasracist

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This Das Racist song will get in your head and do all sorts of insidious things. Not because it’s bad, but because it makes brilliant use of two of the most crucial creative weapons: repetition and variations on a theme.

In an excellent Village Voice interview, the rap duo decree, “My top five favorite poetic devices of all time are repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition, and repetition.” By merely repeating a word, such as repetition, each iteration takes on renewed intensity and a slightly different meaning. Texts that seek great depth often rely on this mechanism. Shakespeare’s Hamlet, for instance: “To die, to sleep; / To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub; / For in that sleep of death what dreams may come…”

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Posted by Jaime Gassmann in Music | 1 Comment »