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Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

Photographs of Spectators

Posted By Jaime Gassmann
03.07.2012

Photographer Thomas Struth recently caught my eye, not only with his photographs, but with what he says in interviews.

In a discussion of one of his mentors, Gerhard Richter, Struth says quite astutely, “And his paintings of photographs, once questioned by purists, now seem to have prefigured a Tumblr and Facebook era in which finding, posting and recycling images are an everyday activity … Everyone is in an archival roller-coaster process of picture language.”

Struth captures a range of subjects, from cityscapes to family portraits. Here’s one photograph of his that reminds me of the constant documentation of mundane daily details in social media:

The reversal of point of view, of the art looking back upon the museum patron, endows these gawkers with profundity. A difficult thing to do. I mean, look at them! And to think that’s what kind of empty-headed look I probably make at the world’s art galleries.

“The museum photographs each show people doing what you are doing yourself – looking at a picture,” says Struth. “For every frame, I waited between one hour and four or five hours for the decisive composition.”

I cannot help but quote at length a famous scene in the Don DeLillo novel White Noise.

Several days later Murray asked me about a tourist attraction known as the most photographed barn in America. We drove 22 miles into the country around Farmington. There were meadows and apple orchards. White fences trailed through the rolling fields. Soon the sign started appearing. THE MOST PHOTOGRAPHED BARN IN AMERICA. We counted five signs before we reached the site. There were 40 cars and a tour bus in the makeshift lot. We walked along a cowpath to the slightly elevated spot set aside for viewing and photographing. All the people had cameras; some had tripods, telephoto lenses, filter kits. A man in a booth sold postcards and slides — pictures of the barn taken from the elevated spot. We stood near a grove of trees and watched the photographers. Murray maintained a prolonged silence, occasionally scrawling some notes in a little book.

“No one sees the barn,” he said finally.

A long silence followed.

“Once you’ve seen the signs about the barn, it becomes impossible to see the barn.”

He fell silent once more. People with cameras left the elevated site, replaced by others.

We’re not here to capture an image, we’re here to maintain one. Every photograph reinforces the aura. Can you feel it, Jack? An accumulation of nameless energies.”

There was an extended silence. The man in the booth sold postcards and slides.

“Being here is a kind of spiritual surrender. We see only what the others see. The thousands who were here in the past, those who will come in the future. We’ve agreed to be part of a collective perception. It literally colors our vision. A religious experience in a way, like all tourism.”

Another silence ensued.

“They are taking pictures of taking pictures,” he said.

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Posted by Jaime Gassmann in Photography, Uncategorized | No Comments »

No Picture

Posted By Jaime Gassmann
02.19.2012

I spent a long weekend in Memphis. I enjoyed myself. But I found it a bit painful to be a tourista on Beale Street. I darkened no doors. I took no pictures. I tried to pretend the Hard Rock Cafe wasn’t there. I tried to walk quickly past the place playing 1990s Lenny Kravitz at a volume that eclipsed the 12-bar blues being played live next door. The change from black neighborhood to tourist mecca is the subject of books, a Joni Mitchell song (Furry Sings the Blues), and this blog post.

Rather than record the neon-lit gaudy re-imagining of the authentic with my cheap digital camera, I give you a sedate historic photo.


Beale Street, 1974

In 2012, what I saw glaring at me up and down that block was nothing particularly new. Simply the co-optation and gentrification of vibrant (and often oppressed) subcultures for profit. And I was the target audience.

We are nostalgic for a singular time and place.
We hope for redux. A thing brought back or restored.
We get simulacrum. A superficial representation. Or more precisely (see Baudrillard’s Simulacra and Simulation), a copy with no original.

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Posted by Jaime Gassmann in Music, Photography, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Biker Chicks

Posted By Jaime Gassmann
12.18.2011

While cruising for last-minute gift ideas, I came upon none that topped the 2011 National Geographic book Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way).

It appeals to the feminists for whom I shop. To the enthusiasts who love bike culture and teach their children how to use the word “peleton” before “potty.” And to everyone who is a friend of Alupa Creative, since all of you will delight in the following quote:

“The bicycle is the devil’s advance agent morally and physically in thousands of instances.”

(For more images and quotes, see this Atlantic review.)

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Posted by Jaime Gassmann in Photography | No Comments »

Light Painting Tutorial

Posted By Alupa Creative
03.13.2010

Article by Mike Oliva, Photographer

Over the last couple of years of taking pictures, I’ve always found that light painting is one of those things that is simply just “cool”.  There are so many possibilities with it that you can really experiment and come up with some great ideas and make some great images.

At it’s very basics, light painting photography is using a long exposure to capture some light source over time.  It can be done with a direct drawing with light or using that light to “paint” an object to make it pop in an image.  I’ve written up a brief explanation of what you need and how to get started.

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Posted by Alupa Creative in Photography | No Comments »

Three Frames

Posted By Josh Dillon
09.08.2009

It’s an old joke, but a good one.

The animated .gif has been around as long as the internet, but for those of us that actually remember when they were all the rage threeframes.net/ has an answer.

The idea is to take three frames from any particular movie, animate, rinse, and repeat. The effects are crazy. I HIGHLY recommend that you check this one out.

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Posted by Josh Dillon in Cinema, Photography, Video | No Comments »

charlie mccarthy: flight patterns

Posted By Josh Dillon
08.10.2009

flight patterns from Charlie McCarthy on Vimeo.

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Posted by Josh Dillon in Photography, Street Art, Video | No Comments »

Signs of Downtown fort worth

Posted By Josh Dillon
08.02.2009

Ac_signs_post

While visiting downtown Fort Worth, it struck me how many kitschy signs adorned the storefronts and bars along the way. With an overarching cowboy theme (it’s a cowtown), there still was room for a little variety, such that even regional chain restaurants pulled out the stops to throw up some neon.

Check out the gallery here.

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Posted by Josh Dillon in Environmental Design, Photography, Street Art | No Comments »

comic-con gallery addition

Posted By Josh Dillon
07.30.2009

We’ve added a new gallery of Comic-con schwag from Jeff’s recent trip to the 40th (!) Annual San Diego Comic-con.

In honor of this new gallery addition I’d like to also direct you to the site of Greg De Stefano, photographer of the strange world of hyper-realistic Nintendo characters. This gallery caught my eye when doing some research for a game that we were thinking of programming for one of our clients, and now seems like a good time to throw in a plug.

AC_Luigi-brother

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Posted by Josh Dillon in Graphic Art, Photography | No Comments »

The art of jason hackenwerth

Posted By Josh Dillon
07.30.2009

AC_BalloonArt5

I first saw the work of Jason Hackenworth when attending the Coachella Music Festival in 2007.

I was standing in a throng of people, waiting in a ridiculously long line for water in 105 degree heat, trying to stay lucid. I was familiar with the fair-like performance artists, the installation pieces and the crazy body-art-laden festival attendees, but I wasn’t quite prepared for walking balloon art, stalking through the crowd on the legs of dancers.

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Posted by Josh Dillon in Environmental Design, Photography, Street Art | No Comments »

Faces all around

Posted By Alupa Creative
07.16.2009

AC_faces_post

Our new gallery, “Faces all around,” is a photography exercise that focuses on finding faces in everyday objects; from electrical outlets to street side industrial creations.

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Posted by Alupa Creative in Graphic Art, Official Communique, Photography | No Comments »